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A New Hope (for our Theatre Industry)

The theatre industry will change because we, together, decide it should. While all experiments may not succeed, the ones that do will be revolutionary.

vancouverplayhouseA Little Note of Encouragement and Inspiration…

Mnemonic Theatre Productions began as a little dream between two boys who wanted to do plays. We wanted to create theatre that people wanted to watch. It was born between cocktails and conversation and best-friendship. And it was conceived through the blood, sweat and many tears of two young men, too stupid to know better. And it was realized by two man-children who were never told that their dreams were unattainable.

In my mid-twenties I realized that there was nothing that I wanted to fight for more than then the healthy sustainability of one of our oldest art forms. And so what began as a selfish dream was actualize by a cold hard look into the bleak nature of the art that I know and love.

Hundreds of actors are inducted into the theatre industry every year. They step into the big big world from their protective theatre schools and they quickly realize that the world of theatre that they expected is in a state of disarray. The glory days are over.

But, I find hope in this. While long standing institutions like The Vancouver Playhouse fall to their knees, there is a new hope that shines. The light may not be strong, or perhaps understood, but it is there. It is a light that dreams, and hopes and above all fights for a theatre industry that is innovative and challenging, that is daring and courageous.

There is a hope for the theatre industry. There is hope in the artists who dare to dream of telling stories that no one wants to hear… until they hear it. There is hope in the independent theatre that challenges the status quo and that looks their limitations in the eye and says, “Watch me!”

The theatre industry will change because we, together, decide it should. While all experiments may not succeed, the ones that do will be revolutionary. And the ones that do will follow the chapter in the theatre history textbooks that praise the glory days of 60’s. The glory days of theatre will no longer be a fond memory, but a practice of collective unity because we, as a people, as a culture, deem it to be so.


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Caleb McMullen

Written by Caleb McMullen

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheatreisforSuckers.com

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